Vibrant colour and materials

My work is often material led, and making a dress for the shifttWorks project is no exception. From the beginning, I planned to use an vibrant edge lit material that I discovered last year for clients who wanted a wow factor for their entrance atrium installation.

edge lit colour orange vinyl

Any cut edges or needle holes glow as if the fabric is lit from within

I find it uplifting to use, so I’m always keen to find another project to use it for

Glow panels under construction in my studio

Glow panels under construction in my studio

and in situ in the atrium of their house

and in situ in the atrium of their house

I often begin a new project by sifting through the thousands of photographs I’ve taken. I take photographs all the time, very rarely of people – not even my family…usually of seemingly mundane objects forming interesting compositions of line, grids, vivid colour; whatever catches my eye.

printing shelf grids as inspiration

Print room drying racks

Laser cut circles found on a glass cutting mat

Laser cut circles found on a glass cutting mat

Interesting tyre stacking formation...and the treads

Interesting tyre stacking formation…and great tread patterns

Organic forms overlaid with geometric shapes and lines – rain drips running down the patchy bark of a plane tree

Organic forms overlaid with geometric shapes and lines – rain drips running down the patchy bark of a plane tree

I’m interested in different methods of construction for my shift dress and particularly ways to maximise the glowing cut edges of the vinyl. So this distorted honeycomb board will be a starting point for this when I get to the sampling stage next month

and joining, connecting and fastening techniques. I took these images on a wander around the yacht club in Poole

I’m also looking at joining, connecting and fastening techniques. I took these images on a wander around a yacht club in Poole

Anna Glasbrook Poole

These images form my sketchbook. I rarely take photographs specifically for a project, unless it’s for site-specific work, preferring to sift through the images I already have because this often sets me off on a thought process that hadn’t occurred to me. I don’t like to think too much about it, preferring to work intuitively.

I might gather 50 images, but often I already know which is the one I’m going to use, but sifting through is an important part of the development process.

Anna Glasbrook

Advertisements